Monday, November 26, 2012

521 Blog Post #5


Tina Ayers

521

This semester I have been surprised by the literacy levels of my students. They are able to memorize new vocabulary words and definitions pretty well. In a geometry class everyday there are new words to decode and remember. Whether they actually understand the meaning is hard to say, but for purposes of remembering a term for an exam, they have done well at that. When given literacy assignments, I noticed that the students were not able to communicate their cognitive thinking procedures regarding a mathematical problem very well. They used simple sentences that were full of grammatical errors, and they did not try to elaborate much. This was a bit shocking to me because I know that these students are high achievers so my expectations of them were rather high.

Journal January 30, 2013

My literacy-rich classroom has a library of books and magazines that are math related one such book is Math Talk. I am requiring that the students find whatever interested them in these books, and have them share their findings with the class. This will be part of an ongoing literacy activity throughout the year. Another aspect that makes my classroom literacy-rich is that the students keep a journal of daily quick-writes, on how they are going to work effective that day, how they are going to approach the day’s problem or activity, and at the end of the day they will reflect on their actions/procedures. This keeps them engaged in the moment.

Journal December 15, 2013

My literacy-rich classroom’s library has grown and students have contributed to the collection. My students are engaged in collaborating and finding ways to help each other understand content by talking and sharing their problem solving strategies.

Journal May 30, 2014

My literacy-rich classroom has portrayals of student work all over the room that have come from their readings of math related articles and texts.  The students are engaged in keeping up their daily journals and reflecting on how they have grown as mathematician by looking back at where they started in their journal as opposed to where they are now. My students are capable of independent learning in the following areas: self-assessment/reflection to bring forth growth, and mathematical connections to real-world issues by reading mathematical publications and scholarly journals.

 

Monday, November 12, 2012

blog 4 (521)


Tina Ayers

521

In this video link “Students Speak Up to President Obama about how to improve their schools students are answering a question posed to them by an organization that creates nation-wide school surveys in order to collect tons of data regarding different aspects of schooling and the feelings/opinions from students, administration, and parents regarding these aspects. The question posed in this particular video is “What would you say to President Obama in a letter in order to improve your school?” There are different students, maybe 15 or so, ranging from grades 9-12. Some of their- responses vary, and some are similar if not the same.

My opinion of the video is one of distrust. I distrust that these students were spontaneous in their replies to the question “What would you say to President Obama in order to improve your school?” The responses given by these students were cookie-cutter responses that they have either heard adults talk about or read somewhere. The only original response was when one 12th grade student suggested that the government treats the public education system as a business and put more focus on the students as a priceless commodity in that it will yield better results, even that one is a remedy that I have read before, but at least it was less common. Every other response that was given were answers that sounded like they were lifted right out of some “fix-our-schools” literature.

Something that surprised me was the fact that the video only interviewed 9th-12th graders and from only three different high schools, two being from the same state. I find it rather inspiring to listen to the younger student’s opinions and aspirations; they haven’t yet been influenced by society telling them what’s what.

Something that did not surprise me was the responses. As I previously mentioned all of the responses are issues that we have all heard before, so being an adolescent in a system that is trained to regurgitate information, these students were telling the camera what it wanted to hear; the “right” answer.

Some being:

• Smaller class sizes to ensure smaller teacher to student ratios

• More technology

• More enthusiastic teachers

• Make learning fun and interactive, more hands on

The list goes on…

If any of these responses were original, then why didn’t we hear any of the students ideas regarding English language learners and the struggles they have inside and outside of school, or why didn’t we hear anyone ask for better food choices, or more sports programs, or anything towards the fact that some schools have swimming pools, gymnasiums, and caf├ęs on their campus and others do not? To me, these sound like things that a typical 14 year-old might say.

My struggle with this survey system is that it is posing questions in these students minds that otherwise may have never been an issue to them in the first place. I liken it to fixing something that isn’t broken. If any of it is truly what these students are thinking about as they walk through their schools halls, or if it is what they are pondering while sitting through a math lesson, then I’ll be damned. Whether the students are or not isn’t much of the issue. The issues is that we as teachers know what the schools need, and we can do something to improve the education in the USA.

As a teacher I can hope to alleviate some of these stressors by creating hands on curriculum, requesting and planning for more field trips, pushing for iPads in the classrooms at teacher meetings, by always making a connection to real world applications in my lessons, and by fostering every student’s capacity to blossom with creativity and inspiration.

UNIT PLAN 511


Tina Ayers                                                     EDSS 511                                         10-17-12

Geometry Unit

Unit Context

Subject Content Area: Geometry – Relationships Within Triangles

Course: Geometry

Grade Level: High School 9-10

Length of Unit: The unit will last for 5 days for 90 minutes per day, so a total of 450 minutes. The days of the unit are in late October.

Facts about the learners

Whole Class Information

Number of Students in the Class: 38 students in the class.

Demographic Information: 22 female students and 16 male students. The ethnic background of the students consist of 27 Caucasian, 1 Japanese, 1 Indian, 1 African American, 1 Vietnamese, 1 Korean, 1 Persian, 1 Chinese, 1 Scottish, 1 Israeli, 1 Polish, 1 South Asian

Developmental Needs

Interests: The students are interested in many things. A few being: Badminton, tennis, soccer, swimming, reading, singing, dance, clubs, martial arts, volunteering, baking, horseback riding, guitar, animals, music, drawing, sleeping, eating, etc.

Learning Profiles: Kinesthetic, Individual, working in groups, and visual.

Individual Student Information

1.    Elena: Elena is a 15 year-old female student who is an English Language Learner at the Early Intermediate range. She is from Mexico, where she enjoys visiting her family. Her parents are professionals and Elena is literate in Spanish. She enjoys coming to school, and is sometimes shy, but is liked by others and works well in groups. While in school in Mexico, she received above average grades.

 

 

Developmental Needs

Readiness: Elena’s CELDT scores indicate that she is at the Early Intermediate range for reading and writing. She will need help developing her use of the English language in order to progress in reading and writing skills.

Interests: She enjoys dancing and spending time with her family. She also enjoys coming to school since she is hardly ever absent.

Learning Profile: Elena is an independent learner as well as one who enjoys working in groups.

Differentiation Strategies

Process/Readiness: Teacher uses visual displays and lecture to give information. Teacher has students work in pairs to support development.

Process/Readiness: Students work in pairs to discuss and solve problems.

Product/Learning Profile: Students will take notes, work in pairs, and go up to the board to explain work.

Content/Readiness: Students use pre-printed skeleton notes to organize content.

Process/Learning Profile: Having the students pair into partners and checking for understanding by listening and looking at progress.

The learning goals will be assessed through formative assessments which include homework, daily warm-ups, oral confirmation in class discussion, and a test. Additional support is available on the teacher’s website which includes videos and a key to the notes.

2.    Alex: Alex is a 15 year-old male in the 10th grade. Alex has been diagnosed as having a specific learning disability. He has a hard time sounding out words and reading to comprehend. He self-isolates and doesn’t contribute to class discussions or group work.

Developmental Needs

Readiness: Alex can read at the 7th grade level. Alex needs support in reading comprehension; he also needs guidance to be able to work in groups.

Interests: Alex enjoys being alone.

Learning Profile: Alex is a self-isolator and prefers to not participate in class discussions.

Differentiation Strategies

Process/Readiness: Teacher uses visual displays and lecture to give information. Teacher has students work in pairs to support development.

Process/Readiness: Students work in pairs to discuss and solve problems.

Product/Learning Profile: Students will take notes, work in pairs, and go up to the board to explain work.

Content/Readiness: Students use pre-printed skeleton notes to organize content.

Process/Learning Profile: Pairing into partner and checking for understanding by listening and looking at progress.

The learning goals will be assessed through formative assessments which include homework, daily warm-ups, oral confirmation in class discussion, and a test. Additional support is available on the teacher’s website which includes videos and a key to the notes. Additional support will be provided by placing students in strategic pairs. Help is available at lunch.

3.    Alyssa: Alyssa is a 15 years old female in the10th grade. Alyssa is considered to have a specific learning disability with significant discrepancy between ability and achievement in the areas of reading and written language impacts progress in classes. Alyssa has an outgoing personality and is very helpful in the classroom. She enjoys acting.

Developmental Needs

Readiness: Alyssa can read at the 7th grade level. Comprehension is challenging for her. She can write multi-paragraph essays, with errors in spelling, mechanics and sentence structure (run-ons). She is making good progress in mathematics.

Interests: clubs, painting, sleeping, dance, babysitting.

Learning Profile: working in pairs, visual.

Differentiation Strategies

Process/Readiness: Teacher uses visual displays and lecture to give information. Teacher has students work in pairs to support development.

Process/Readiness: Students work in pairs to discuss and solve problems.

Product/Learning Profile: Students will take notes, work in pairs, and go up to the board to explain work.

Content/Readiness: Students use pre-printed skeleton notes to organize content.

Process/Learning Profile: Pairing into partner and checking for understanding by listening and looking at progress.

A graphic organizer is provided to support her visually. The learning goals will be assessed through formative assessments which include homework, daily warm-ups, oral confirmation in class discussion, and a test. Additional support is available on the teacher’s website which includes videos and a key to the notes. Additional support will be provided by placing students in strategic pairs. Help is available at lunch. A graphic organizer is provided to support her visually.

4.    Yusuke: Yusuke is a 14 year old 9th grade male student. He was born in Bangkok, Thailand while his family was there for his father’s work. He moved to Japan at age 5, and then to the U.S. at age 11 due to his father’s work. He plays water polo on the school’s team and plays golf with his parents. He likes to read history books written in Japanese.

Developmental Needs

Readiness: Yusuke has received a CELDT score when tested at the 7th grade level of 1 for reading, a 2 for writing, a 3 for listening, a 3 for speaking, a 0 for comprehension, and a 0 for CELDT criterion.

Interests: Yusuke is interested in water polo and swimming. He also plays golf with his parents. He enjoys reading books written in Japanese.

Learning Profile: He is a visual and kinesthetic learner. He does not speak out in class to offer contribution to class discussion. He does collaborate in groups.

Differentiation Strategies

Process/Readiness: Teacher uses visual displays and lecture to give information. Teacher has students work in pairs to support development of the English language and math content.

Process/Readiness: Students work in pairs to discuss and solve problems.

Product/Learning Profile: Students will take notes, work in pairs, and go up to the board to explain work.

Content/Readiness: Students use pre-printed skeleton notes to organize content.

Process/Learning Profile: Pairing into partner and checking for understanding by listening and looking at progress.

Key vocabulary words with definitions are provided to support his language acquisition. The learning goals will be assessed through formative assessments which include homework, daily warm-ups, oral confirmation in class discussion, and a test. Additional support is available on the teacher’s website which includes videos and a key to the notes. Additional support will be provided by placing students in strategic pairs. Help is available at lunch. Key vocabulary words with definitions are provided to support his language acquisition.

5.    Maria: Maria is a 14 year-old American student in the 9th grade with family heritage from Mexico, Scotland, and Spain. She is in the fashion and optimist club at school. She is also on the speech and debate team. She takes drawing and design, geometry, earth/space science, and Spanish. She takes dance lessons and art class outside of school.

Developmental Needs

Readiness: Maria is a bright student who needs to be challenged.

Interests: She is in the fashion and optimist club at school. She is also on the speech and debate team. She takes drawing and design, geometry, earth/space science, and Spanish. She takes dance lessons and art class outside of school.

Learning Profile: She is mostly a visual learner who likes to work individually when she understands the subject.

Differentiation Strategies

Process/Readiness: Teacher uses visual displays and lecture to give information. Teacher has students work in pairs to support development of the English language and math content. She is a bright student who needs to be challenged.

Process/Readiness: Students work in pairs to discuss and solve problems. Can work individually if they choose to.

Product/Learning Profile: Students will take notes, work in pairs, and go up to the board to explain work.

Content/Readiness: Students use pre-printed skeleton notes to organize content.

Process/Learning Profile: Pairing into partner and checking for understanding by listening and looking at progress.

Additional review problems/challenge problems are listed on the class website for students who wish to challenge themselves. The learning goals will be assessed through formative assessments which include homework, daily warm-ups, oral confirmation in class discussion, and a test. Additional support is available on the teacher’s website which includes videos and a key to the notes. Additional support will be provided by placing students in strategic pairs. Help is available at lunch. Additional review problems/challenge problems are listed on the class website for students who wish to challenge themselves.

 

 

Unit Rational

This unit is essential to building the students’ ability to write formal rigorous proofs, using the ideas of logic which include: contrapositive, inverse, and indirect reasoning. This topic in math not only enhances their mathematical minds, but it creates a student that is able to think critically, logically, and critically.

Enduring Understanding: The use of the mathematics in this unit is inevitable found all around us. While constructing the Panama Canal, the engineers used the distance formula to create paths where distances between major bodies of water are the shortest.

Essential Questions:

1.    Why is it important to learn about relationships within triangles? (Explanation)

2.    How can you use this knowledge to further you development as a student, as a person? (Application)

3.    What do we know about the constructed world around us that uses these mathematical properties? What do we know about the natural world around us that uses these mathematical properties? (Perspective)

Standards

California Content Standards:

•GEOM 17.0: Students prove theorems by using coordinate geometry; including: the midpoint of a line and the distance formula.

 

•GEOM 2.0: Students write geometric proofs, including proofs by contradiction. 5.0

 

•GEOM 4.0: Students prove basic theorems involving congruence and similarity.

 

•GEOM 5.0 Students prove that triangles are congruent, and they are able to use the concept of corresponding parts of congruent triangles.

 

•GEOM 21.0: Students prove and solve problems regarding relationships among chords, secants, tangents, inscribed angles, and inscribed and circumscribed polygons of circles.

 

•GEOM 6.0: Students know and are able to use the triangle inequality theorem.

 

California ELD Standards

 

•Listening & Speaking Cluster 1, I – Listen attentively to stories and information and identify important details and concepts by using both verbal and nonverbal responses.

                           

•Listening & Speaking Cluster 3, I – Make oneself be understood when speaking by using consistent standard English grammatical forms and sounds; however, some rules may not be followed (e.g., third-person singular, male and female pronouns).

                           

•Listening & Speaking Cluster 7, I – Respond to messages by asking questions or by briefly restating the message.

 

                           

Unit Objectives (according to the day)

1.       Actively participating in taking notes, SWBAT use properties of midsegments to solve problems.

2.       After completing an activity SWBAT prove basic theorems and share them with the class.

3.       After reviewing appropriate vocabulary and actively listening to guided instruction, SWBAT solve problems regarding chords, secants, tangents, inscribed angles, and inscribed and circumscribed polygons of circles.

4.       After listening to guided instruction and taking copious notes, SWBAT write formal proofs using inverse, contrapositive, and indirect reasoning.

5.       After listening to guided instruction and taking copious notes, SWBAT prove situations in geometry using the triangle inequality theorem.

 

 

Assessments (according to the day)

 

1.    Formative: Walk around and check for understanding. Students will properly apply the formulas and use them to solve problems correctly.          

2.    Formative: Collect work and see if the proofs are correct. They should use the    

correct vocabulary and the correct theorems.

3.    Formative: Walk around and check for understanding. Collect homework to solve  

problems regarding circumscribed and inscribed polygons of circles and chords.

4.    Formative: Collect work and review to see that students apply the correct theorems and terms to prove situations in geometry.

5.    Summative: Collect work and review to see that students apply the correct theorems and terms to prove situations in geometry. A unit exam will be given on day 6.

 

Into: Students study triangles to identify and apply midsegment, perpendicular bisectors to prove relationship in triangles.

 

Objective/Purpose: After actively taking notes and participating in paired activities, SWBAT write proofs justifying certain aspects of given triangles, using appropriate logic including, inverse, contrapositive, and indirect reasoning.

 

Student Activity:

            • Students actively participate in lecture notes (30 min)

            • Students partner up to discuss and practice the application (20 min)

            • Students check their work according to results given by teacher (20 min)

            • Students discuss with partners ways to improve reasoning (10 min)

            • Students prepare for homework (10 min)

 

Hook: Teacher introduces lesson by relating it to interesting real-world applications, such as building the Panama Canal.

           

Assessment:

Entry level – Students will be assessed on their understanding of the material by paired and class discussion.

Formative – Students will complete warm-up and turn in homework daily.

Summative – Students will take an end of unit exam.

 

Through: Students will apply all acquired content knowledge until now to work through solving assigned mathematical problems.

 

Unit Calendar: Relationships Within Triangles

 

               
 
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Content Standards
GEOM 17.0 Students prove theorems by using coordinate geometry. Including: the midpoint of a line and the distance formula.
 
 
 
GEOM: 2.0, 4.0, 5.0
Students write geometric proofs, including proofs by contradiction. Students prove basic theorems involving congruence and similarity. Students prove that triangles are congruent, and they are able to use the concept of corresponding parts of congruent triangles.
 
 
GEOM 2.0, 21.0
Students write geometric proofs, including proofs by contradiction.
Students prove and solve problems regarding relationships among chords, secants, tangents, inscribed angles, and inscribed and circumscribed polygons of circles.
GEOM 2.0 Students write geometric proofs, including proofs by contradiction.
GEOM 2.0, 6.0
Students write geometric proofs, including proofs by contradiction.
Students know and are able to use the triangle inequality theorem.
 
Learning Objectives
Cognitive: After actively participating in taking notes, SWBAT use properties of midsegments to solve problems.
 
 
 
Cognitive: After completing an activity SWBAT prove basic theorems and share them with the class.
Cognitive: After reviewing appropriate vocabulary and actively listening to guided instruction, SWBAT solve problems regarding chords, secants, tangents, inscribed angles, and inscribed and circumscribed polygons of circles.
 
Cognitive: After listening to guided instruction and taking copious notes, SWBAT write formal proofs using inverse, contrapositive, and indirect reasoning.
Cognitive: After listening to guided instruction and taking copious notes, SWBAT prove situations in geometry using the triangle inequality theorem.
 
Student Activity
Activity lab: Technology: Investigating midsegments. Students will practice solving problems using midsegment and distance formula.
 
 
 
Students will use properties of perpendicular bisectors and angle bisectors.
 Activity lab: Technology: Special segments in triangles. Students practice solving and proving relationships regarding chords, secants, tangents, inscribed angles, and inscribed and circumscribed polygons of circles.
Write the negation of a statement and the inverse and the contrapositive of a conditional statement. Use indirect reasoning.
Students will understand the triangle inequality theorem and use it to prove situations in geometry.
Assessment
Formative: walk around and check for understanding. Students will properly apply the formulas and use them to solve problems correctly.
                      
 
 
Formative:
Collect work and see if the proofs are correct. They should use the correct vocabulary and the correct theorems.
Formative: walk around and check for understanding.
Collect homework to solve problems regarding circumscribed and inscribed polygons of circles and chords.
Formative:
Collect work and review to see that students apply the correct theorems and terms to prove situations in geometry.
Formative/Summative:
Collect work and review to see that students apply the correct theorems and terms to prove situations in geometry. A unit exam will be given on day 6.
Exceptionality Strategy Matrix
Develop life-long strategies with student to counterbalance weaknesses of disability; Participation in cooperative learning; Outline lesson; Different study habits & organization tools; Frequent practice, review; Allow time for child to respond; Questions be in written form.
Maintain high expectations.

 

Closure/Beyond:

Closure: Students will take a unit exam to show their comprehension of the unit.

Beyond: Students will retain this knowledge and apply it to upcoming scaffolded lessons.

                                                Assessment Evaluation

1.    Strength: A strength in the assessment is having a variety of ways to assess students learning through homework, quizzes, discussion, and exam.

2.    Weakness: A weakness in the assessment is the walk around and check for understanding. I think sometimes a teacher may not get to hear everyone work.

3.    Additional assessments: an addition assessment for the unit could be a project based on finding the shortest distance to a real-world object from the student’s home.

a.    When: on day 1 for homework.

b.    Goal: to assess students ability to choose which method to use, and to help them belter understand the concept.

c.    Purpose: this will enable the teacher to see if they can apply math to a real world problem.

d.    Implementation: on day 1 given as a homework assignment. It would be due on day 3.

e.    Feedback: feedback will be given during class discussion and the teacher will write comments on their returned assignments.

f.     Inform instruction: The teacher will be able to note any misconceptions on the vocabulary. This will allow for the teacher to review these areas, it will also inform if the students are ready to move on.

 

 

                              Lesson 1 of Relationships Within Triangles Unit

 Lesson
Tina Ayers

1. TITLE OF THE LESSON
Midsegment and Distance Formula
2. CURRICULUM AREA & GRADE LEVEL
High School Geometry 9-10 grade
3A. STUDENT INFORMATION: EL-
Yusuke
  1. Readiness Level- Early Intermediate. Yusuke has received a CELDT score when tested at the 7th grade level of 1 for reading, a 2 for writing, a 3 for listening, a 3 for speaking, a 0 for comprehension, and a 0 for CELDT criterion.
  2. Learning Profile- He is a visual and kinesthetic learner. He does not speak out in class to offer contribution to class discussion. He does collaborate in groups.
  3. Interest- Yusuke is interested in water polo and swimming. He also plays golf with his parents. He enjoys reading books written in Japanese.
3A. STUDENT INFORMATION: SN
Alyssa
  1. Readiness Level- Alyssa can read at the 7th grade level. Comprehension is challenging for her. She can write multi-paragraph essays, with errors in spelling, mechanics and sentence structure (run-ons). She is making good progress in mathematics.
  2. Learning Profile- Visual, working in groups
  3. Interest- clubs, painting, sleeping, dance, babysitting
4. RATIONALE

A. Enduring Understanding- Midsegments of triangles allow us to make comparison with other triangles; knowing the distance formula allows us to find lengths of segments. These aspects allow us to deduce certain properties about triangles, i.e., are they congruent?

B. Essential Questions- What is the difference between a midsegment and the distance formula? When do we apply the distance formula opposed to the midsegment formula and vice versa? How can we use the distance formula in our everyday life?

C. Reason for Instructional Strategies and Student Activities- the students need to learn this material to further their understanding of the geometry. They will get support from lectures, examples, and working in pairs. This will allow support for ELL’s and special needs students.  
5. CONTENT STANDARD: GEOM 17.0 Students prove theorems by using coordinate geometry. Including: the midpoint of a line and the distance formula.






6. ELD STANDARD (S)-
READING Fluency & Systematic Vocabulary Development: Cluster 2. I-
Apply knowledge of text connections to make inferences. Use decoding skills and knowledge of both academic and social vocabulary to achieve independent reading.


7. LEARNING GOAL (S) - OBJECTIVE (S)

 Cognitive -
After actively participating in taking notes, SWBAT use properties of midsegments and the distance formula to solve problems accurately and rigorously
Language Development- After reading the instructions and problems in the textbook independently, each student will be able to work through the problems effectively and in a timely manner (finish by the end of the period).


8. ASSESSMENT (S)
Assessing EL at (i+1), i.e., teacher will listen for students use of academic and communicative use of the English language while he is working with his partner. The teacher will be assessing the appropriate use of grammar and vocabulary when reviewing the assignments that the student has submitted.

C. Formative- Students will complete and in class worksheet in order to assess what they have learned about the midsegment and distance formula. The teacher will review the assignment; look for the appropriate use of the English language by checking for comprehension. This will show if the student was or was not able to use decoding skills from the lecture in order to write out his/her proofs. While working with a partner to solve problems, the teacher can walk around and listen in on the conversation. The teacher will be able to tell if the student is picking up on the social vocabulary by listening to his responses and questions to his partner. The teacher will look at work and check for understanding.
9A. EXPLANATION OF IFFERENTIATION FOR
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

1.) Content/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest - Students were able to write down and reflect on lesson for the day in order to communicate with their peers in order to clarify their understanding. Having things written down helps support ELLs visually.

2.) Process/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest- Walking around the class when students are working independently or with a partner in order to clarify what each student or students need based on their level. Working with a partner helps the ELL by talking and getting feedback in an informal setting.

3.) Product/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or
Interest- Students will be able to collaborate with their partner in order to discuss the topic and help each other. By reviewing trhe handed-in assignments I will be able to see if the student was able to read the textbook and work with a partner to answer the questions correctly.
9B. EXPLANATION OF DIFFERENTIATION FOR
STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

1.) Content/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest - Students were able to use take notes that were on the board and ask questions if they did not understand. If they are hesitant to ask questions we will walk around and make sure everyone understands.

2.) Process/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest- when walking around we will make sure these students understand or able to give them more examples to practice.

3.) Product/Based on Readiness, Learning Profile or Interest- Students will be able to collaborate with their partner in order to discuss the topic and help each other.
10. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

A. Anticipatory Set/Into- Students will be introduced to midsegment and the distance formula. Knowing these terms will help students be able to complete problems on homework. As the students come in the warm up exercise will be on the board. The teacher will read the vocabulary words out loud while the students copy them down. The teacher will collect the homework and pass back graded work. (15min)
B. Instruction/Through- Teacher will write definitions, examples on the board and play a video from YouTube. The teacher will explain in detail the steps necessary to working through these problems. Any questions/class discussion can take place. (25min)

C. Guided Practice/Through- After the teacher is done filling in the notes, the students will instruct the students to work in pairs to solve the remaining examples in book. Do problems 1 – 39 odds; pages 262 – 265. (20min)

D. Independent Practice/Through- Teacher will make sure students are on task while completing their problems and help the student’s when/if they run into any confusion. Teacher can tell if ELL comprehends by checking the students work. (20min)

E. Closure- the teacher collects their work in order to close the day with some fun and candy! This helps the kids leave the classroom on a happy note and leave with a smile wanting to come back.(10min)

F. Beyond- Students are told if they have questions on homework please come to at lunch.
11. STUDENT ACTIVITIES

A. Anticipatory Set/Into- Students will take out their notebooks and copy down the vocab list from the board. The use of visual vocabulary will allow the ELL to see and hear the words at the same time.

B. Instruction/Through- Students will actively listen to the teacher instruct them on how to complete problems.

C. Guided Practice/Through- Students will copy definitions, examples from the board and watch a video from YouTube. The teacher will explain in detail the steps necessary to working through these problems. Any questions/class discussion can take place.
D. Independent Practice/Through- While working with a partner, students complete problems in book.

E. Closure- Students submit completed worksheet.

F. Beyond- Complete homework
12. RESOURCES
•YouTube link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vD3bP-jVHw
•textbook
*Note - Highlighted areas suggest SDAIE strategies and strategies for special needs.

 

Reflection

After completing this assignment, I can see how important it is to get to know your students. It will create a better learning environment if the students are treated as individuals with individual needs. Being especially aware of ELL’s is important to me because they needed extra special support or else they will be lost and may feel hopeless. For the next time that I use this unit I will incorporate something that has to do with cultural heritage or the students interests. This will engage the students and make the learning activities a lot more fun.

 

UNIT RUBRIC                                             20 points  


 

Design Component
& Criteria
Approaching
Meets
(Including the criteria for Approaching & Meets)
Exceeds
(Including the criteria for Approaching, Meets & Exceeds)
Unit Context
1 point
Describes the subject/content area, curse, grade level & …
& describes the length of unit, number of class periods and lengths of periods.
& describe where it fits within the year plan.
Student Facts
2 points
Provide information the whole class (demographics, readiness, interests, learning profile) …
& describe 5 individual students (2 ELL, 2 Special Ed and another student of your choice). Include the student’s name, label, grade level, culture, language, SES, family, affect, individual ed goals, readiness (reading, writing and subject area level), interests, & learning profile …
& include information about students’ affects and needs for their learning environment.
Different-iation
3 points
Describe the differentiation strategy(ies) for the 5 individual students…
& label the strategy (content, process or product) and the way it addresses the students identity and developmental needs (readiness, interest or learning profile)…
& provide how the strategy will be assessed for effectiveness and altered if needed.
Unit Rationale
1 point
Explain the importance of unit in the student’s big picture of learning & describes the enduring understandings - what student’s will know and be able to do at the end of the unit …
& articulate what essential questions you will use to frame the unit  and an explanation of how the instruction and activities are appropriate for students developmental needs (readiness, interests & learning profile)…
& label the questions based on the Six Facets of Understanding from Wiggins & McTighe’s Understanding By Design.
Standards and Objectives
1 point
Both CA Content and ELD Standards are identified and each is addressed in an objective that contains a condition, verb, and criteria …
& each objective is labeled by the type (cognitive, affective, psychomotor or language) and number of the standard it addresses… 
& identify which of the Six Facets of Understanding it is designed to address.
Assessment
2 points
Provide an assessment for each objective and articulate type, formality, purpose, & implementation …
& provides a rubric ... 
& provide description of how you will communicate expectations i.e. a self-assessment  process or a sample of student work.
Into
1 point
Provide an into, activity for unit …
& describe in detail the steps the teacher will take to implement the into lesson and any need materials (i.e. graphic organizer, ppt, model, rubric)…
& provide script for teacher and times for each activity.
Through
2 points
Provide a unit calendar outlining what is addressed each day (objectives, standards, student activity and assessment) …
& each activity is student centered with multiple opportunities for the instructor to check for understanding…
& provide ELD Standard(s) and objective(s) specific to the language development.
Beyond
1 point
Provide a beyond activity for unit …
& describe in detail the steps the teacher will take to implement the beyond activities and any need materials (i.e. graphic organizer, ppt, model, rubric)…
& provide script for teacher and times for each activity.
Lesson Plans
4 points
Lesson plan(s) and materials provided …
& 1 lesson meets all the components for the Single Subject Lesson Design Format including all the instructional materials …
& a full scripted lesson is provided for each day of the week.
Materials & Resources
1 point
Describe all the materials needed to implement the lesson/unit…
Provide all the materials and resources needed to teach the unit…
& provide assignment samples to model expectations.
Reflection
1 point
Address all the reflection prompts about differentiation, strengths and limits of the lesson, & effectiveness of lesson …
& describe what you learned about yourself and your students…
& identify what you would keep in mind for the next lesson.
 
Self-Evaluation
1 point will be deducted if not included
Provide a copy of the rubric with the unit plan…
& highlight the criteria for each component…
& provide hand written evidence for each criteria marked and identify what page for each item.